The Interactive AIDS Memorial Quilt Kickstarter Project is AMAZING!! http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1769813233/aids-memorial-quilt-mobile-web-app-0 Dear Friends, To honor the 25th anniversary of the creation of the AIDS Memorial Quilt, several events are taking place in Washington DC this summer. The QUILT 2012 events begin with the display of the Quilt as part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival from June 27-July 8, 2012.   Later in July, to coincide with the AIDS XIX International Conference, the Quilt will be laid out on the National Mall for the first time since 1996.   From July 21-July 24, 12,000 Quilt panels will be displayed each day.    On July 25th, a single panel dedicated to “The Last One” will be displayed.   We are planning a concluding symposium on the History of AIDS and the Cultural Significance of the AIDS Memorial Quilt. Working with the NAMES Project Foundation, I am coordinating the production of the digital experiences that will be part of the QUILT 2012 events.  These digital experiences are being created in collaboration with teams from University of Southern California, Brown University, and Microsoft Research. We are also collaborating with the Digital Studio for the Public Humanities, at the University of Iowa, under the direction of artist Jon Winet, to build a MOBILE WEB APP called AIDS Quilt Touch.   This mobile web app will enable visitors to SEARCH for a specific NAME on a panel, to CONTRIBUTE comments to a digital guest book, and to LOCATE the display of a specific panel when it is laid out on the National Mall. We are running a KICKSTARTER Campaign to raise funds to create this Mobile Web App and to support the efforts to publicize the digital experiences during the QUILT 2012  events. Please consider contributing to this fundraising campaign.  And please send this email to your friends and colleagues who might also be interested in contributing to this effort. If you would like more information about The Digital Experiences for QUILT 2012, please contact me directly. Thank you for your attention to this request, and I look forward to seeing you at this historic event in Washington DC this summer. http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1769813233/aids-memorial-quilt-mobile-web-app-0 Cordially, Anne Balsamo Project Coordinator Digital Experience, QUILT 2012 Professor University of Southern California annebalsamo@gmail.com Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

The Interactive AIDS Memorial Quilt Kickstarter Project is AMAZING!!

Dear Friends,

To honor the 25th anniversary of the creation of the AIDS Memorial Quilt, several events are taking place in Washington DC this summer.

The QUILT 2012 events begin with the display of the Quilt as part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival from June 27-July 8, 2012.  
Later in July, to coincide with the AIDS XIX International Conference, the Quilt will be laid out on the National Mall for the first time since 1996.   From July 21-July 24, 12,000 Quilt panels will be displayed each day.   

On July 25th, a single panel dedicated to “The Last One” will be displayed.   We are planning a concluding symposium on the History of AIDS and the Cultural Significance of the AIDS Memorial Quilt.
Working with the NAMES Project Foundation, I am coordinating the production of the digital experiences that will be part of the QUILT 2012 events. 

These digital experiences are being created in collaboration with teams from University of Southern California, Brown University, and Microsoft Research.
We are also collaborating with the Digital Studio for the Public Humanities, at the University of Iowa, under the direction of artist Jon Winet, to build a MOBILE WEB APP called AIDS Quilt Touch.  

This mobile web app will enable visitors to SEARCH for a specific NAME on a panel, to CONTRIBUTE comments to a digital guest book, and to LOCATE the display of a specific panel when it is laid out on the National Mall.
We are running a KICKSTARTER Campaign to raise funds to create this Mobile Web App and to support the efforts to publicize the digital experiences during the QUILT 2012  events.

Please consider contributing to this fundraising campaign.  And please send this email to your friends and colleagues who might also be interested in contributing to this effort.
If you would like more information about The Digital Experiences for QUILT 2012, please contact me directly.

Thank you for your attention to this request, and I look forward to seeing you at this historic event in Washington DC this summer.

Cordially,

Anne Balsamo

Project Coordinator
Digital Experience, QUILT 2012

Professor
University of Southern California

Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

This INSANE Graphic Shows How Ludicrously Complicated Social Media Marketing Is Now This INSANE Graphic Shows How Ludicrously Complicated Social Media Marketing Is Now Charlie Minato | May 17, 2012, 10:22 AM | 550,425 | 250 Maybe this is the reason General Motors went “mental” and pulled its Facebook ad budget. Digital marketing is confusing—really confusing—as this insane graphic shows (below). Trying to navigate through the various new social media categories, blogs, sharing sites, and social media firms is an absolute mess. This depiction of the digital marketing landscape was shown at a Buddy Media event marking the launch of the social marketing software agency’s new suite of measurement tools. You can click to enlarge it, but that won’t make it look any simpler. Bonus points for reader Ryan, who realized Pinterest isn’t on there.   Buddy Media / Luma Partners Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/social-media-marketing-landscape-complicated-2012-5?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+businessinsider+%28Business+Insider%29#ixzz1vfKOA5RR Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

This INSANE Graphic Shows How Ludicrously Complicated Social Media Marketing Is Now

This INSANE Graphic Shows How Ludicrously Complicated Social Media Marketing Is Now

Maybe this is the reason General Motors went “mental” and pulled its Facebook ad budget.

Digital marketing is confusing—really confusing—as this insane graphic shows (below).

Trying to navigate through the various new social media categories, blogs, sharing sites, and social media firms is an absolute mess.

This depiction of the digital marketing landscape was shown at a Buddy Media event marking the launch of the social marketing software agency’s new suite of measurement tools.

You can click to enlarge it, but that won’t make it look any simpler.

Bonus points for reader Ryan, who realized Pinterest isn’t on there.

Buddy Media / Luma Partners

Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

A Harvard MBA’s radical quest to erase his debt B-school grad Joe Mihalic went on an extreme financial diet to pay down over $90,000 in debt in just seven months and charted his story through an anonymous blogging project. By John A. Byrne (Poets&Quants) — When he graduated from the Harvard Business School three years ago this month, the economy was a wreck. Nearly one in four of his classmates didn’t have a job at graduation in May 2009. Yet, Joe Mihalic, then 26, was able to land a job with Dell (DELL) in Austin, Texas, at twice as much as the $52,000 a year he made before earning his MBA. But there was some overhang from his experience in Boston: roughly $101,000 in loans that he had to borrow to get the degree, even after Harvard gave him $54,000 in fellowship support. Mihalic, of course, is hardly alone. The average debt of a Harvard MBA last year was $77,880, up from $73,110 a year earlier. Wharton MBAs, however, racked up average debt loads estimated to be an unprecedented $114,000, and the median financial burden for an MBA from a top-10 business school from the Class of 2011 is about $88,500. Despite Mihalic’s six-figure burden in the midst of the economic downturn, he gleefully jumped into a free-spending lifestyle that had defined his MBA experience. He bought a 2004 BMW M3 in the same month he graduated from Harvard. From Thursday to Saturday nights, he did the town with pricey dinners and drinks. For his 28th birthday, he barhopped with friends in a black stretch Hummer. Though Mihalic had budgeted $850 a month for entertainment, he was commonly spending $1,300 monthly. But there was one place where he didn’t slough off. For 21 months straight, he dutifully made the monthly $1,057 payments on his student debt. It wasn’t until last summer, when he checked his balance, was he thrown into shock. After paying out more than $22,000, he still owed $90,717, a sum that exceeded his after-tax salary for a year. Going the extreme financial diet route A back-of-the-envelope calculation showed that Mihalic would pay $42,000 in additional interest if the loans went to their natural 10- and 15-year terms. That is when he vowed to go on an extreme financial diet to get rid of the burden. “Student loans are a strange animal,” he reasoned. “Unlike a payment towards a car loan or a mortgage, a student loan payment doesn’t go towards something that is benefitting me in a direct way.” He vowed to do “everything in my power — short of lying, cheating, and stealing — to pay down this debt in the next 10 months.” Except that in his case, he also decided to chronicle the journey on a blog called No More Harvard Debt. The idea to anonymously write about the sacrifices he was about to make occurred to Mihalic last August after knocking out a cover letter to apply for a weekend delivery job. Even to him, taking a part-time position to pay down more of his debt seemed like a peculiar thing to do as a Harvard MBA with a six-figure management job at a Fortune 50 company. “I took a step back and it wasn’t until I stopped laughing at myself that I realized others might enjoy laughing at me, too,” he recalls. “The blog started as a joke. I had every intention of following through on my challenge when I started it, but I wanted to let people be amused by it and get a laugh at it, too.” Over the next seven-and-a-half months, through 88 separate posts, he vividly describes his experience. His blog is, at times, introspective, witty, and sincere, often inspirational. His finances are laid bare, open for all to see as if he were dissecting a frog in a high school lab. From his $20 haircuts to his monthly car insurance of $171, he meticulously details every expense and just about every source of revenue in his life. He writes with humor and flair on what it is like to be a cheap date over a cup of coffee or a hike in the woods. But what allows Mihalic to maintain this entertaining and often addictive narrative of what he calls “the walk to debt freedom” was his extreme goal. The challenge resulted in sacrifices that few of his classmates could ever endure. He gave up all dinner dates and didn’t go to a single movie. He stopped contributing to his 401k plan, decided against going home for Christmas, and missed his friends’ parties and weddings. When he went to bars with friends, he carried a flask with booze to mix with his purchased Coke (KO). He shared a NetFlix (NFLX) account and refused to buy a single article of clothing. To earn extra money, he sold his second car and a motorcycle, rented his spare bedrooms to strangers through Craiglist, and started a side business doing landscaping work. Quickly, he chipped away at his debt. To start, he liquidated his IRA account for $8,000, sold stock worth $14,000, and used about $3,000 of available cash to wipe out one loan. Within seven months, he managed to make his final payment and rid himself of all his debt in March of this year — three months ahead of his goal. Leaning on thrifty origins His fanaticism to quickly toss off the debt albatross has its roots in a relatively modest upbringing, despite the fact that his father is a successful auto executive. “I come from a family that respects the value of money — almost to a fault,” he explained in one post. “While money never appeared to be tight, it never got thrown around, either. My mom bought my clothes at Kohl’s. If I wanted name brand, I had to pay for it myself. My mom spent her Saturday mornings clipping coupons. Every single Saturday evening — without fail, no exaggerations — we went to mass followed by dinner at Olive Garden, Red Lobster, or some similarly priced restaurant.” One anecdote is especially telling. “My dad is extremely careful with money, and he has gone to lengths to try to instill that value within me,” the Harvard MBA wrote. “It took him two weeks and a couple of trips to K-Mart before he finally bought me a bicycle when I was five. When I outgrew that, he paid for a second bike a few years later. On the car ride home after the second shopping trip, he told me that that would be the last bike he ever paid for.” After he graduated from the University of Michigan with a degree in business in 2005, he went to work as a supervisor in a factory in Austin. “I decided the bonuses and raises of my blue-collar staff, so I knew how little they made and I saw how many of them were living paycheck to paycheck,” he wrote. “In addition, the factory was constantly under the threat of being outsourced and off-shored. Between these two influences, I never felt fat and happy, and was always watching my back for that tap on the shoulder that signals the beginning of a lay-off.” Weaning off of the MBA spending culture He concedes now that a shift in his lifestyle occurred during his two years in the MBA program at Harvard. “At HBS, $100 dinners for one person in downtown Boston are a standard affair,” he says. “Nobody thinks twice about taking an international vacation — they just go. I remember a friend told me she was going with a group of students to Oktoberfest for the weekend. I asked her what bar she was heading to. She laughed at me and told me the bars in Germany — she was going to the actual Oktoberfest — for the weekend!” His conclusion is obvious, yet filled with truth. “A lot of people in this country — regardless of socioeconomic status — have an unhealthy obsession with things and experiences and statuses. We shop brands; we drop names. We try to keep up with the Joneses. We comfortably tolerate an unhealthy level of debt.” Each day during his challenge, Mihalic would pore over a spreadsheet that tracked his progress. The negatives, when he went over his budget, were marked in red, and the positives were in green. On March 29, after seven months of discipline and patience, he made his final payment on the debt. Mihalic says he then had to ask his roommates for their rent a few days early so he could meet his mortgage payment three days later. "I felt good," he recalls. "I knew that the reward would be worth it. I got misty-eyed looking at the progress I made and all the work that went into it. My heart was beating so hard and I was still in shock that I had done it. On that day I made that payment, I had nothing. But every day I go to work now I’m actually increasing my wealth instead of reducing my debt." Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

A Harvard MBA’s radical quest to erase his debt

B-school grad Joe Mihalic went on an extreme financial diet to pay down over $90,000 in debt in just seven months and charted his story through an anonymous blogging project.

By John A. Byrne

(Poets&Quants) — When he graduated from the Harvard Business School three years ago this month, the economy was a wreck. Nearly one in four of his classmates didn’t have a job at graduation in May 2009. Yet, Joe Mihalic, then 26, was able to land a job with Dell (DELL) in Austin, Texas, at twice as much as the $52,000 a year he made before earning his MBA.

But there was some overhang from his experience in Boston: roughly $101,000 in loans that he had to borrow to get the degree, even after Harvard gave him $54,000 in fellowship support.

Mihalic, of course, is hardly alone. The average debt of a Harvard MBA last year was $77,880, up from $73,110 a year earlier. Wharton MBAs, however, racked up average debt loads estimated to be an unprecedented $114,000, and the median financial burden for an MBA from a top-10 business school from the Class of 2011 is about $88,500.

Despite Mihalic’s six-figure burden in the midst of the economic downturn, he gleefully jumped into a free-spending lifestyle that had defined his MBA experience. He bought a 2004 BMW M3 in the same month he graduated from Harvard. From Thursday to Saturday nights, he did the town with pricey dinners and drinks. For his 28th birthday, he barhopped with friends in a black stretch Hummer. Though Mihalic had budgeted $850 a month for entertainment, he was commonly spending $1,300 monthly.

But there was one place where he didn’t slough off. For 21 months straight, he dutifully made the monthly $1,057 payments on his student debt. It wasn’t until last summer, when he checked his balance, was he thrown into shock. After paying out more than $22,000, he still owed $90,717, a sum that exceeded his after-tax salary for a year.

Going the extreme financial diet route

A back-of-the-envelope calculation showed that Mihalic would pay $42,000 in additional interest if the loans went to their natural 10- and 15-year terms. That is when he vowed to go on an extreme financial diet to get rid of the burden. “Student loans are a strange animal,” he reasoned. “Unlike a payment towards a car loan or a mortgage, a student loan payment doesn’t go towards something that is benefitting me in a direct way.”

He vowed to do “everything in my power — short of lying, cheating, and stealing — to pay down this debt in the next 10 months.” Except that in his case, he also decided to chronicle the journey on a blog called No More Harvard Debt. The idea to anonymously write about the sacrifices he was about to make occurred to Mihalic last August after knocking out a cover letter to apply for a weekend delivery job.

Even to him, taking a part-time position to pay down more of his debt seemed like a peculiar thing to do as a Harvard MBA with a six-figure management job at a Fortune 50 company. “I took a step back and it wasn’t until I stopped laughing at myself that I realized others might enjoy laughing at me, too,” he recalls. “The blog started as a joke. I had every intention of following through on my challenge when I started it, but I wanted to let people be amused by it and get a laugh at it, too.”

Over the next seven-and-a-half months, through 88 separate posts, he vividly describes his experience. His blog is, at times, introspective, witty, and sincere, often inspirational. His finances are laid bare, open for all to see as if he were dissecting a frog in a high school lab. From his $20 haircuts to his monthly car insurance of $171, he meticulously details every expense and just about every source of revenue in his life. He writes with humor and flair on what it is like to be a cheap date over a cup of coffee or a hike in the woods.

But what allows Mihalic to maintain this entertaining and often addictive narrative of what he calls “the walk to debt freedom” was his extreme goal. The challenge resulted in sacrifices that few of his classmates could ever endure. He gave up all dinner dates and didn’t go to a single movie. He stopped contributing to his 401k plan, decided against going home for Christmas, and missed his friends’ parties and weddings. When he went to bars with friends, he carried a flask with booze to mix with his purchased Coke (KO). He shared a NetFlix (NFLX) account and refused to buy a single article of clothing.

To earn extra money, he sold his second car and a motorcycle, rented his spare bedrooms to strangers through Craiglist, and started a side business doing landscaping work. Quickly, he chipped away at his debt. To start, he liquidated his IRA account for $8,000, sold stock worth $14,000, and used about $3,000 of available cash to wipe out one loan. Within seven months, he managed to make his final payment and rid himself of all his debt in March of this year — three months ahead of his goal.

Leaning on thrifty origins

His fanaticism to quickly toss off the debt albatross has its roots in a relatively modest upbringing, despite the fact that his father is a successful auto executive. “I come from a family that respects the value of money — almost to a fault,” he explained in one post. “While money never appeared to be tight, it never got thrown around, either. My mom bought my clothes at Kohl’s. If I wanted name brand, I had to pay for it myself. My mom spent her Saturday mornings clipping coupons. Every single Saturday evening — without fail, no exaggerations — we went to mass followed by dinner at Olive Garden, Red Lobster, or some similarly priced restaurant.”

One anecdote is especially telling. “My dad is extremely careful with money, and he has gone to lengths to try to instill that value within me,” the Harvard MBA wrote. “It took him two weeks and a couple of trips to K-Mart before he finally bought me a bicycle when I was five. When I outgrew that, he paid for a second bike a few years later. On the car ride home after the second shopping trip, he told me that that would be the last bike he ever paid for.”

After he graduated from the University of Michigan with a degree in business in 2005, he went to work as a supervisor in a factory in Austin. “I decided the bonuses and raises of my blue-collar staff, so I knew how little they made and I saw how many of them were living paycheck to paycheck,” he wrote. “In addition, the factory was constantly under the threat of being outsourced and off-shored. Between these two influences, I never felt fat and happy, and was always watching my back for that tap on the shoulder that signals the beginning of a lay-off.”

Weaning off of the MBA spending culture

He concedes now that a shift in his lifestyle occurred during his two years in the MBA program at Harvard. “At HBS, $100 dinners for one person in downtown Boston are a standard affair,” he says. “Nobody thinks twice about taking an international vacation — they just go. I remember a friend told me she was going with a group of students to Oktoberfest for the weekend. I asked her what bar she was heading to. She laughed at me and told me the bars in Germany — she was going to the actual Oktoberfest — for the weekend!”

His conclusion is obvious, yet filled with truth. “A lot of people in this country — regardless of socioeconomic status — have an unhealthy obsession with things and experiences and statuses. We shop brands; we drop names. We try to keep up with the Joneses. We comfortably tolerate an unhealthy level of debt.”

Each day during his challenge, Mihalic would pore over a spreadsheet that tracked his progress. The negatives, when he went over his budget, were marked in red, and the positives were in green. On March 29, after seven months of discipline and patience, he made his final payment on the debt. Mihalic says he then had to ask his roommates for their rent a few days early so he could meet his mortgage payment three days later.

"I felt good," he recalls. "I knew that the reward would be worth it. I got misty-eyed looking at the progress I made and all the work that went into it. My heart was beating so hard and I was still in shock that I had done it. On that day I made that payment, I had nothing. But every day I go to work now I’m actually increasing my wealth instead of reducing my debt."

Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

Maria Shriver’s USC 2012 Commencement Speech, “Pause, take a moment.” Congratulations to the Class of 2012!   Posted May 11, 2012 By Gretchen Parker and Jeremy Rosenberg As part of the University of Southern California’s 129th Commencement Ceremonies, USC Annenberg celebrated the conferral of bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees to 872 students on May 11. (View photos here.) Dean Ernest J. Wilson III reminded graduates of how important their roles in the new, connected world of communication will be. "All of you – using your training and education as a base – are prepared not to be just bystanders in the transition to a new digital economy, where we can shine light into the dark corners and where we can communicate more effectively with our neighbors here and around the world. We don’t want you to be observing from the sidelines. We want you to lead these changes." School of Communication At the School of Communication ceremony, former California First Lady, author and journalist Maria Shriver (pictured with Dean Wilson) delivered a moving speech from the perspective of a professional communicator – and a mom. Her daughter, Katherine Schwarzenegger (B.A. Communication ‘12) was in the audience of more than 500 graduates. “I’m pausing to be in awe of this moment, that I’m standing at my first child’s graduation from college,” she said to her daughter, seated in a crowd of robes and mortar boards. Her voice choked, but she continued: “Katherine, I’m in awe of you – where are you? I’m in awe of the woman you are, your grace and courage and strength. I’m so proud of all of you, and what you’ve done to get here.” She won laughs as she recalled her own graduation from Georgetown University, when her friends were drinking and celebrating (with champagne under their robes) – but she was worried. It took her until October to find a job in TV news after graduating in May. She gave graduates straightforward advice they might not have heard from professors, parents and friends. At a time when everyone they know is asking them, “What’s next? Do you have a job? Where will you live?” graduates should pause, consider what they want to do with their lives and make deliberate choices, Shriver said. The “What are you going to do next?” question dogs us our entire lives, she said. “Even today at my age, people come up to me all the time asking, ‘Maria, What are you doing? What’s your job? Are you going back into television? What are you doing?’ It’s like what we’re doing at this precise moment doesn’t even exist. Everyone is focused on the next thing,” Shriver said. The pressure won’t stop with landing the first job, so try not to get caught up in everyone’s expectations and find what you want to do most, she said. “Today, I have one small wish for you. Before you go out and press that fast-forward button, I’m hoping – I’m praying – that you’ll have the courage to first press the pause button.” By pausing, graduates will have a chance to reflect and move into their careers with purpose, Shriver said. USC Annenberg graduates have the opportunity to affect communication positively, and they should take advantage of it. “You have the power, each and every one of you, to change the way we as a nation speak to one another – the way we write, the way we use our words. I truly believe you can change our national discourse for the better. You have the chance to change the way we talk to one other, what we read in newspapers and on the web and in magazines. You can help us change the channel. I hope each and every one of you dare to bring change to our community by changing the way we communicate.” Rather than using “criticism and fault-finding,” graduates should work to change communication for the better. “Change it from nay-saying and name-calling to acceptance and appreciation. Change it from screaming to speaking… from dissembling and dishonesty to openness and explanation.” “Show us the way, Annenberg graduates. Take us out to what I’ve been calling, ‘the open field.’ Go beyond, to what can only be imagined. I know you can do it, because a communications degree means nothing today unless you take it beyond where we are and into the unknown. And in order to do that, you’re going to have to learn how to listen and how to pause.” Even during their work lives, which will be hectic, it will be important to take a breath and reflect on communicating inwardly as well as outwardly, Shriver said. “Take the time to find out what’s important to you. Find out what you love, what’s real and true to you, so that it can infuse and inform your work and make it your own,” she said. She was interrupted with applause when she cautioned grads to verify information before disseminating it. “It’s up to you to decide if you want to pass on garbage, or if you want to check the facts,” Shriver said. “Pause before you hit the send button and forward a picture that could ruin somebody’s life. Pause before you write something nasty on somebody’s wall because you think it’s funny. Believe me, it isn’t.” Shriver also won loud, supportive applause with this line: “Pause before forwarding the untrue and inflammatory tidbit that makes it so difficult for would-be public servants to serve, and for their families to exist in the public arena.” Communication has so much power to do good, Shriver said. And with that power comes responsibility. “So remember to pause and reflect – before you sign on with someone or some organization whose work you do not admire and don’t respect and you can’t stand up for. Who you work for is as important as what you do,” she said. She urged graduates also to be thankful for the journey that brought them here – and to thank the people who made it possible. And she encouraged them to do that with pen and paper (and mentioned she’s never hired anyone who didn’t send a hand-written thank-you note after an interview). The audience also appreciated this advice: “While you’re pausing, I hope you’ll do something refreshingly different and talk to your mother, your father or someone you care deeply about. Not text them – but actually talk to them with your mouth.” Finally, Shriver left the group with the inspirational message to be courageous as they make their way. “Wherever you go in live, however fast you’re going, remember this: When you’re in doubt, pause. Take a moment look at all of your options, check your intention, have a conversation with your heart. And then always take the high road. “Fight to make a difference in this world. Fight for good. Fight for fairness. Fight on.” School of Journalism At the School of Journalism ceremony, ABC News anchor Christiane Amanpour, who also delivered the address for the USC main commencement ceremony, told the crowd of more than 300 journalism and public relations graduates: “I feel very at home here with all of you journalists.” She praised graduates ’ enthusiasm and said they were right to be “boisterous and curious and eager to set off on adventure.” Citing her own experiences in Bosnia, Rwanda and elsewhere, Amanpour beseeched the audience to never confuse objectivity with neutrality, or hard-sought fact with the chatter of under-informed opinion. She urged humility and stressed responsibility among all of the graduates – public relations and journalism alike – as they rise to positions of power. Amanpour also made sure the crowd knew that her profession has a bright future. “There is a great, great need for wonderful journalists who have been trained at a great school. I am massively hopeful. There are jobs – some of them may be less traditional than before,” she said, adding: “I want you to go out there with a great sense of optimism and can-do.” The importance of journalism as a career can’t be overstated, she said. “You actually cannot have a robust and healthy democracy without a healthy and robust journalism profession.” Amanpour rallied the students by passing along lessons and observations gained during her highly acclaimed career. “I learned,” Amanpour said, “that this is the most noble profession known to humankind.” Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

Maria Shriver’s USC 2012 Commencement Speech, “Pause, take a moment.”

Congratulations to the Class of 2012!

 

Posted May 11, 2012

By Gretchen Parker and Jeremy Rosenberg

As part of the University of Southern California’s 129th Commencement Ceremonies, USC Annenberg celebrated the conferral of bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees to 872 students on May 11. (View photos here.)

Dean Ernest J. Wilson III reminded graduates of how important their roles in the new, connected world of communication will be.

"All of you – using your training and education as a base – are prepared not to be just bystanders in the transition to a new digital economy, where we can shine light into the dark corners and where we can communicate more effectively with our neighbors here and around the world. We don’t want you to be observing from the sidelines. We want you to lead these changes."

School of Communication

At the School of Communication ceremony, former California First Lady, author and journalist Maria Shriver (pictured with Dean Wilson) delivered a moving speech from the perspective of a professional communicator – and a mom. Her daughter, Katherine Schwarzenegger (B.A. Communication ‘12) was in the audience of more than 500 graduates.

“I’m pausing to be in awe of this moment, that I’m standing at my first child’s graduation from college,” she said to her daughter, seated in a crowd of robes and mortar boards. Her voice choked, but she continued: “Katherine, I’m in awe of you – where are you? I’m in awe of the woman you are, your grace and courage and strength. I’m so proud of all of you, and what you’ve done to get here.”

She won laughs as she recalled her own graduation from Georgetown University, when her friends were drinking and celebrating (with champagne under their robes) – but she was worried. It took her until October to find a job in TV news after graduating in May.

She gave graduates straightforward advice they might not have heard from professors, parents and friends. At a time when everyone they know is asking them, “What’s next? Do you have a job? Where will you live?” graduates should pause, consider what they want to do with their lives and make deliberate choices, Shriver said.

The “What are you going to do next?” question dogs us our entire lives, she said.

“Even today at my age, people come up to me all the time asking, ‘Maria, What are you doing? What’s your job? Are you going back into television? What are you doing?’ It’s like what we’re doing at this precise moment doesn’t even exist. Everyone is focused on the next thing,” Shriver said.

The pressure won’t stop with landing the first job, so try not to get caught up in everyone’s expectations and find what you want to do most, she said.

“Today, I have one small wish for you. Before you go out and press that fast-forward button, I’m hoping – I’m praying – that you’ll have the courage to first press the pause button.”

By pausing, graduates will have a chance to reflect and move into their careers with purpose, Shriver said. USC Annenberg graduates have the opportunity to affect communication positively, and they should take advantage of it.

“You have the power, each and every one of you, to change the way we as a nation speak to one another – the way we write, the way we use our words. I truly believe you can change our national discourse for the better. You have the chance to change the way we talk to one other, what we read in newspapers and on the web and in magazines. You can help us change the channel. I hope each and every one of you dare to bring change to our community by changing the way we communicate.”

Rather than using “criticism and fault-finding,” graduates should work to change communication for the better. “Change it from nay-saying and name-calling to acceptance and appreciation. Change it from screaming to speaking… from dissembling and dishonesty to openness and explanation.”

“Show us the way, Annenberg graduates. Take us out to what I’ve been calling, ‘the open field.’ Go beyond, to what can only be imagined. I know you can do it, because a communications degree means nothing today unless you take it beyond where we are and into the unknown. And in order to do that, you’re going to have to learn how to listen and how to pause.”

Even during their work lives, which will be hectic, it will be important to take a breath and reflect on communicating inwardly as well as outwardly, Shriver said.

“Take the time to find out what’s important to you. Find out what you love, what’s real and true to you, so that it can infuse and inform your work and make it your own,” she said.

She was interrupted with applause when she cautioned grads to verify information before disseminating it.

“It’s up to you to decide if you want to pass on garbage, or if you want to check the facts,” Shriver said. “Pause before you hit the send button and forward a picture that could ruin somebody’s life. Pause before you write something nasty on somebody’s wall because you think it’s funny. Believe me, it isn’t.”

Shriver also won loud, supportive applause with this line: “Pause before forwarding the untrue and inflammatory tidbit that makes it so difficult for would-be public servants to serve, and for their families to exist in the public arena.”

Communication has so much power to do good, Shriver said. And with that power comes responsibility.

“So remember to pause and reflect – before you sign on with someone or some organization whose work you do not admire and don’t respect and you can’t stand up for. Who you work for is as important as what you do,” she said.

She urged graduates also to be thankful for the journey that brought them here – and to thank the people who made it possible. And she encouraged them to do that with pen and paper (and mentioned she’s never hired anyone who didn’t send a hand-written thank-you note after an interview).

The audience also appreciated this advice: “While you’re pausing, I hope you’ll do something refreshingly different and talk to your mother, your father or someone you care deeply about. Not text them – but actually talk to them with your mouth.”

Finally, Shriver left the group with the inspirational message to be courageous as they make their way.

“Wherever you go in live, however fast you’re going, remember this: When you’re in doubt, pause. Take a moment look at all of your options, check your intention, have a conversation with your heart. And then always take the high road.

“Fight to make a difference in this world. Fight for good. Fight for fairness. Fight on.”

School of Journalism

At the School of Journalism ceremony, ABC News anchor Christiane Amanpour, who also delivered the address for the USC main commencement ceremony, told the crowd of more than 300 journalism and public relations graduates: “I feel very at home here with all of you journalists.”

She praised graduates ’ enthusiasm and said they were right to be “boisterous and curious and eager to set off on adventure.”

Citing her own experiences in Bosnia, Rwanda and elsewhere, Amanpour beseeched the audience to never confuse objectivity with neutrality, or hard-sought fact with the chatter of under-informed opinion.

She urged humility and stressed responsibility among all of the graduates – public relations and journalism alike – as they rise to positions of power.

Amanpour also made sure the crowd knew that her profession has a bright future. “There is a great, great need for wonderful journalists who have been trained at a great school. I am massively hopeful. There are jobs – some of them may be less traditional than before,” she said, adding: “I want you to go out there with a great sense of optimism and can-do.”

The importance of journalism as a career can’t be overstated, she said. “You actually cannot have a robust and healthy democracy without a healthy and robust journalism profession.”

Amanpour rallied the students by passing along lessons and observations gained during her highly acclaimed career.

“I learned,” Amanpour said, “that this is the most noble profession known to humankind.”

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297
Calgon Take Me Away In This Super Bathtub From Heaven! I almost got to try this bad boy out in person, but the scheduling didn’t quite work out. You’re actually lucky, as you now get to see someone beautiful in the bath, and not yours truly. Rub a dub dub. Here’s what’s up: Kohler has built something called the ‘Underscore VibrAcoustic Bath,’ which might be the coolest bit of bathroom tech that we have seen in some time. Yes, we get emails about bathroom tech. You can be jealous. The tub has moodlights, speakers, and underwater vibrating units (that are also speakers), it works with music (yours or what is provided), turning your bath into something will blow all your senses. Hell, I would give up showering and just take baths if I had one of these; my apartment building manager, sadly, won’t allow the remodel. What can you do. Oh yeah, and the music unit has a big touchscreen so that you can control the whole deal while wet. Check the clip, you’ll want one. Bad news? The full kit and kaboodle will run you just under 5 large. Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

Calgon Take Me Away In This Super Bathtub From Heaven!

2012-04-23 17h44_07

I almost got to try this bad boy out in person, but the scheduling didn’t quite work out. You’re actually lucky, as you now get to see someone beautiful in the bath, and not yours truly. Rub a dub dub.

Here’s what’s up: Kohler has built something called the ‘Underscore VibrAcoustic Bath,’ which might be the coolest bit of bathroom tech that we have seen in some time. Yes, we get emails about bathroom tech. You can be jealous.

The tub has moodlights, speakers, and underwater vibrating units (that are also speakers), it works with music (yours or what is provided), turning your bath into something will blow all your senses. Hell, I would give up showering and just take baths if I had one of these; my apartment building manager, sadly, won’t allow the remodel. What can you do.

Oh yeah, and the music unit has a big touchscreen so that you can control the whole deal while wet. Check the clip, you’ll want one.

Bad news? The full kit and kaboodle will run you just under 5 large.

Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

Universal film fest takes flight on American Onboard festival idea developed by USC students Our USC PR Team Delivered This Idea That Was Picked Up! Onboard festival idea developed by USC students By Marc Graser Universal Pictures will launch an inflight film fest on select American Airlines routes, as part of the studio’s centennial celebration and a partnership with the University of Southern California. "Field of Dreams" and "Seabiscuit" will be featured beginning April 30 on American’s Flight 1 and Flight 22 that travel between New York’s John F. Kennedy Intl Airport and Los Angeles Intl Airport. The studio recently approached USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism to develop ideas for its 100th anniversary, with senior executives presenting Professor Matthew Le Veque’s Social, Digital and Mass Media Strategies graduate class with the centennial’s overarching themes and objectives. The onboard film festival was developed by the 17 students from a brainstorming session. "The partnership with USC was a great way for us to create an initiative that was authentic and appealed to our fans," said Rick Finkelstein, Universal Pictures vice chairman and chief operating officer. "We’re excited to share Universal’s special day with select American Airlines customers. This is a fun and interesting way for us to engage and bring fans together, while celebrating our anniversary. We’re grateful to the students at USC and American Airlines for helping us highlight our 100 years in moviemaking with this unique opportunity and partnership." American is calling the result the airline’s “first-ever inflight film festival,” which will make the pics available for free on inflight entertainment systems, along with gift bags that will be distributed at the gates of participating flights prior to departure that include a coupon for a free 15-minute inflight internet session, headphones for their listening pleasure and classic movie candy. Up to 10 winners, chosen from qualifying tweets, will also receive a Universal Centennial Blu-ray prize pack through May 1. USC’s Jerry Swerling, director of the school’s strategic communication and public relations center at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, said working on U’s campaign “is a perfect example of the real world opportunities we seek for our USC Annenberg students. We are thrilled that Universal Pictures is using one of our students’ ideas and are grateful for this opportunity.” Contact Marc Graser at marc.graser@variety.com Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

Universal film fest takes flight on American Onboard festival idea developed by USC students

Our USC PR Team Delivered This Idea That Was Picked Up!

Onboard festival idea developed by USC students

Universal Pictures will launch an inflight film fest on select American Airlines routes, as part of the studio’s centennial celebration and a partnership with the University of Southern California.

"Field of Dreams" and "Seabiscuit" will be featured beginning April 30 on American’s Flight 1 and Flight 22 that travel between New York’s John F. Kennedy Intl Airport and Los Angeles Intl Airport.

The studio recently approached USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism to develop ideas for its 100th anniversary, with senior executives presenting Professor Matthew Le Veque’s Social, Digital and Mass Media Strategies graduate class with the centennial’s overarching themes and objectives.

The onboard film festival was developed by the 17 students from a brainstorming session.

"The partnership with USC was a great way for us to create an initiative that was authentic and appealed to our fans," said Rick Finkelstein, Universal Pictures vice chairman and chief operating officer. "We’re excited to share Universal’s special day with select American Airlines customers. This is a fun and interesting way for us to engage and bring fans together, while celebrating our anniversary. We’re grateful to the students at USC and American Airlines for helping us highlight our 100 years in moviemaking with this unique opportunity and partnership."

American is calling the result the airline’s “first-ever inflight film festival,” which will make the pics available for free on inflight entertainment systems, along with gift bags that will be distributed at the gates of participating flights prior to departure that include a coupon for a free 15-minute inflight internet session, headphones for their listening pleasure and classic movie candy.

Up to 10 winners, chosen from qualifying tweets, will also receive a Universal Centennial Blu-ray prize pack through May 1.

USC’s Jerry Swerling, director of the school’s strategic communication and public relations center at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, said working on U’s campaign “is a perfect example of the real world opportunities we seek for our USC Annenberg students. We are thrilled that Universal Pictures is using one of our students’ ideas and are grateful for this opportunity.”

Contact Marc Graser at marc.graser@variety.com

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The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs - YouTube Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs - YouTube

Wonder Woman Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

Wonder Woman

List of Open Innovation Crowdsourcing Examples @openinnovators.net Interested in Open Innovation & Crowdsourcing? Follow Open Innovators on twitter or subscribe to the Open Innovators RSS feed! O Intermediary Platforms Research & Development platforms Innocentive - open innovation problem solving TekScout - crowdsourcing R&D solutions IdeaConnection - idea marketplace and problem solving Yet2.com - IP market place PRESANS (beta) - connect and solve R&D problems Hypios - online problem solving Innoget - research intermediary platform One Billion Minds - online (social) challenges NineSigma - technology problem solving Marketing, Design & Idea platforms RedesignMe - community co-creation Atizo - open innovation market place Innovation Exchange - open innovation market place ideaken - collaborative crowdsourcing Idea Bounty - crowdsourcing ideas Guerra Creativa - crowdsourcing anything from logos to websites Brand Tags - tagging brands Battle of concepts - student challenges Brainrack - student challenges crowdSPRING - creative designs BootB.com - custom creative ideas for any creative need Myoo Create - environmental and social challenges 12designer - marketplace for creative solutions LeadVine - crowdsourcing lead generation 99designs - pioneer in design crowdsourcing Edge Amsterdam - elite sourcing platform OpenIDEO - collaborative design platform Challenge.gov - crowdsourced solutions for government problems eYeka - the co-creation community Collective Intelligence & Prediction platforms Inkling Markets - use wisdom of the crowd for forecasting Intrade - global prediction markets NewsFutures - collective intelligence markets Ushahidi - crowdsourcing crisis information Kaggle - data mining and forecasting We Are Hunted - the online music chart ESP Game/Google Image Labeler - crowdsourced image labeling HR & Freelancers platforms TopCoder - competition-based software crowdsourcing Spudaroo - crowdsourcing copywriting HumanGrid - small online task solving ChumBonus - crowdsourcing recruitment Amazon Mechanical Turk - low-cost crowdsourcing Open innovation software spigit - idea management 2.0 Imaginatik - collective intelligence software Napkin Labs - connect with consumers, experts, employees Fellowforce - software/suggestion box 2.0 Intermediary open innovation services Big Idea Group - organize innovation contests and idea hunts Idea Crossing - organize innovation quests Pharmalicensing - open innovation for the life sciences Chaordix - crowdsourcing engine for innovation DataStation - complete innovation platform O Creative Co-creation Spreadshirt - shirt community JuJups - personalized gifts Threadless - create and sell your t-shirts Naked&Angry - threadless for ties and wall coverings cafepress - shop, create or sell what’s on your mind zazzle - create and sell products CreateMyTattoo - crowdsourced tattoo design Sellaband – crowdfunded bands Artistshare – fans funding new artists Quirky - community product development jovoto - co-creation & mass collaboration Dream Heels - design your dream heels O Corporate Initiatives Product Ideas crowdsourcing Ideas Project - crowdsourcing platform by Nokia Fiat Mio - create a car Open Innovation Sara Lee - open innovation portal of Sara Lee P&G Open Innovation Challenge - external idea sourcing in Britain Ideas4Unilever - corporate venturing BMW Customer Innovation Lab - in german LeadUsers.nl & Live Simplicity - Philips’ crowdsourcing platforms Kraft - innovate with Kraft InnovationJam* - IBM’s more internally focussed idea generation project Dell IdeaStorm - external idea sourcing Vocalpoint - P&G’s network for women Betavine - Vodafone’s mobile app community My Startbucks Idea - shaping the future of Starbucks Branding & Design crowdsourcing Spreadshirt Logo Design Contest - let community design new logo Gmail M-Velope Video Competition - viral video competition LEGO Factory - LEGO co-creation tool Peugeot - Peugeot’s design contest Muji - improving and suggesting new designs Electrolux Design Lab - annual design competition for students Fluevog - open shoe design LEGO Mindstorms - open source robots BurdaStyle - open source sewing GoldCorp - the famous GoldCorp Challenge O Peer Production & P2P CrowdSpirit - product development 2.0 Funding Circle - p2p lending Linux - open source software Wikipedia - peer produced encyclopedia Yahoo Answers - crowdsourced Q&A A Swarm of Angels - creating a £ 1 million film … O Public Crowdsourcing iBridge Network - platform for university innovation (iBridge) Science Commons - generic license agreements (Science Commons) Picnic Green Challenge - ideas to save the planet Eureke medical - medical open innovation platform German Catholic Church - catholic church adopts open innovation Fold it - solve puzzles for science Ideas Campaign - citizen ideas in Ireland Galaxy Zoo - discovering the universe O Tip us about other initiatives: contact@openinnovators.net twitter: @philderidder Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

List of Open Innovation Crowdsourcing Examples @openinnovators.net

Interested in Open Innovation & Crowdsourcing?
Follow Open Innovators on twitter or subscribe to the Open Innovators RSS feed!

O
Intermediary Platforms

Research & Development platforms

Marketing, Design & Idea platforms

Collective Intelligence & Prediction platforms

HR & Freelancers platforms

Open innovation software

Intermediary open innovation services

O
Creative Co-creation

O
Corporate Initiatives

Product Ideas crowdsourcing

Branding & Design crowdsourcing

O
Peer Production & P2P

O
Public Crowdsourcing

O

Tip us about other initiatives:

contact@openinnovators.net

twitter: @philderidder

Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

Pinterest’s Unlikely Journey To Top Of The Startup Mountain Derek Andersen posted 3 hours ago 9 Comments Editor’s note: Derek Andersen is founder of Commonred and Startup Grind. Follow him on Twitter @derekjandersen. Over the past 12 months, I’ve had the pleasure of interviewing some of the Valley’s best entrepreneurs and investors at Startup Grind. People like Naval Ravikant, Kevin Rose, Tony Conrad, MG Siegler, Jeff Clavier, and others have inspired us with stories and trials they have overcome to get where they are. In February we hosted Pinterest co-founder (and now officially CEO) Ben Silbermann in Palo Alto. He is one of the most humble entrepreneurs I have met in my seven years in Silicon Valley. The story of Pinterest’s founding is more valuable to me than most startups because it is a reflection of what a lot of founders who regularly read TechCrunch go through in the everyday startup grind. Pinterest’s founders are smart guys, but they’re not prodigies. The product is huge now, but no one liked it when it launched. They weren’t well funded and for a very long time. These are things that normal, non-rock star entrepreneurs like me (and maybe you) can relate to. Founder Background   Raised by doctors in Des Moines Iowa, Ben assumed he would follow the same path as his parents. He attended Yale University starting in 1999 and soon realized that he didn’t want to be doctor. After a consulting gig in Washington DC, he headed to Silicon Valley in 2006 to join Google working in customer support and sales. “I felt the story of my time was happening in California,” he said. “I didn’t have a specific plan I just wanted to be closer to something that felt really exciting. Google was the first company I worked for that was thinking really big.” As a non-engineer at Google, Ben felt there was only so far that he could go in that culture. He kept talking about doing a startup but it was his girlfriend (now wife) who pushed him saying, “You should either do it or stop talking about it.”  After leaving Google he spent time working at places like the Hacker Dojo, and every coffee shop in the valley.  Sound familiar to anyone? To Pivot Or Not To Pivot   Four months after launching, Pinterest only had 200 users.  Ben has said their product was “in stealth mode but not because we wanted it to be.” The first major pockets of users were in Iowa and Utah and the company wasn’t on any radars in the Valley. It didn’t pop in California for the first year and a half. Ben believes the typical market fit philosophy for technology of having to get early adaptors on board is no longer required. There was no press coverage on the site, but the early users really liked it, and more importantly they used it a lot. “The site grew by the same percentage (40%-50%) every single month. It’s just that the number started so low that it took a while to get going.” The team attempted to raise money, but the non-engineer driven founders had little success. Despite dozens of meetings with “everyone” in Silicon Valley. Most passed on the deal. They worked with a lot of engineers most of which weren’t near the Facebook and Google level of talent they’re getting access to today. Remarkably the Pinterest team maintained their original vision despite the Valley’s pressure to be successful quickly or pivot (aka: admit failure). Pinterest’s early traction wasn’t positive. But the Silicon Valley culture and community of being helpful and not giving up kicked in to push the team to keep pressing forward. While feeling the pressures of possible embarrassment if he had to go to Google to ask for his old job back, Ben never seriously considered giving up. Focus On Product   Much of what you see on the site today was in the product at the very beginning. They were one of the first sites to do the grid-like layout and they over invested in design. They spent months working on it. “We were obsessive about the product. We were obsessive about all the writing and how it was described. We were obsessive about the community. I personally wrote to the first 5,000-7,000 people that joined the site.” Pinterest was about getting you offline to do all of these things you’re talking about online. Pinterest was also integrated with Facebook from the very beginning. All the founders were aligned on building something that they were really proud of. “I think we knew from the beginning that we were building a very different kind of product.” Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

Pinterest’s Unlikely Journey To Top Of The Startup Mountain

posted 3 hours ago
ben silbermann

Editor’s note: Derek Andersen is founder of Commonred and Startup Grind. Follow him on Twitter @derekjandersen.

Over the past 12 months, I’ve had the pleasure of interviewing some of the Valley’s best entrepreneurs and investors at Startup Grind. People like Naval RavikantKevin RoseTony ConradMG SieglerJeff Clavier, and others have inspired us with stories and trials they have overcome to get where they are.

In February we hosted Pinterest co-founder (and now officially CEO) Ben Silbermann in Palo Alto. He is one of the most humble entrepreneurs I have met in my seven years in Silicon Valley. The story of Pinterest’s founding is more valuable to me than most startups because it is a reflection of what a lot of founders who regularly read TechCrunch go through in the everyday startup grind.

Pinterest’s founders are smart guys, but they’re not prodigies. The product is huge now, but no one liked it when it launched. They weren’t well funded and for a very long time. These are things that normal, non-rock star entrepreneurs like me (and maybe you) can relate to.

Founder Background

 

Raised by doctors in Des Moines Iowa, Ben assumed he would follow the same path as his parents. He attended Yale University starting in 1999 and soon realized that he didn’t want to be doctor. After a consulting gig in Washington DC, he headed to Silicon Valley in 2006 to join Google working in customer support and sales.

“I felt the story of my time was happening in California,” he said. “I didn’t have a specific plan I just wanted to be closer to something that felt really exciting. Google was the first company I worked for that was thinking really big.”

As a non-engineer at Google, Ben felt there was only so far that he could go in that culture. He kept talking about doing a startup but it was his girlfriend (now wife) who pushed him saying, “You should either do it or stop talking about it.”  After leaving Google he spent time working at places like the Hacker Dojo, and every coffee shop in the valley.  Sound familiar to anyone?

To Pivot Or Not To Pivot

 

Four months after launching, Pinterest only had 200 users.  Ben has said their product was “in stealth mode but not because we wanted it to be.” The first major pockets of users were in Iowa and Utah and the company wasn’t on any radars in the Valley.

It didn’t pop in California for the first year and a half. Ben believes the typical market fit philosophy for technology of having to get early adaptors on board is no longer required. There was no press coverage on the site, but the early users really liked it, and more importantly they used it a lot. “The site grew by the same percentage (40%-50%) every single month. It’s just that the number started so low that it took a while to get going.”

The team attempted to raise money, but the non-engineer driven founders had little success. Despite dozens of meetings with “everyone” in Silicon Valley. Most passed on the deal. They worked with a lot of engineers most of which weren’t near the Facebook and Google level of talent they’re getting access to today.

Remarkably the Pinterest team maintained their original vision despite the Valley’s pressure to be successful quickly or pivot (aka: admit failure). Pinterest’s early traction wasn’t positive. But the Silicon Valley culture and community of being helpful and not giving up kicked in to push the team to keep pressing forward. While feeling the pressures of possible embarrassment if he had to go to Google to ask for his old job back, Ben never seriously considered giving up.

Focus On Product

 

Much of what you see on the site today was in the product at the very beginning. They were one of the first sites to do the grid-like layout and they over invested in design. They spent months working on it. “We were obsessive about the product. We were obsessive about all the writing and how it was described. We were obsessive about the community. I personally wrote to the first 5,000-7,000 people that joined the site.”

Pinterest was about getting you offline to do all of these things you’re talking about online. Pinterest was also integrated with Facebook from the very beginning. All the founders were aligned on building something that they were really proud of. “I think we knew from the beginning that we were building a very different kind of product.”

Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

Katalyst Networks presents “Thrash Labs” Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

Katalyst Networks presents “Thrash Labs”

Intel® The Museum of Me Check out this website I found at intel.com Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

Intel® The Museum of Me

Check out this website I found at intel.com

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It’s BAAACKKK! PUNK’D Premieres Tonight at 10/9C @MTV - YouTube #justinbieber #taylorswift Posted via email from desdemona’s posterous | Comment »

It’s BAAACKKK! PUNK’D Premieres Tonight at 10/9C @MTV - YouTube #justinbieber #taylorswift